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20130201
20130228
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KRCB (PBS) 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> eyes in the sky. the leaders of japan and the u.s. are considering additional radar to track threats from north korea. japanese prime minister shinzo abe has blocked off an important meeting in his agenda. he's heading to whington to meet with u.s. president barack obama. white house officials say they'll discuss economic issues, the u.s.-japan security alliance, and their approach to north korea. north korean officials launched a rocket in december. they said they put a satellite into space. but western leaders say they were testing technology for a ballistic missile. some security analysts say such a missile could reach the u.s. west coast and could carry a nuclear payload. north korean scientists carried out another underground nuclear test last week. and authorities in pyongyang have hinted they may conduct another rocket launch before the end of this year. abe and obama will meet on friday at the white house. japanese government officials say the leaders will discuss the deployment of a second x band radar. u.s. army personnel already operate those systems at an air self
the unemployment rate is too high at the moment. so the head of the u.s. federal reserve has defended the central bank's monetary stimulus package. this has eased concerns fed officials would cut short their asset-buying program. chairman ben bernanke on tuesday presented his semi-annual report to the senate. he acknowledged bold monetary easing could cause inflationut stressedhe mit of the licy. >> we do not see potential cost to the increased risk taking in some financial markets as outweighing the benefits of promoting a strong economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> bernanke also warned imminent spending cuts could put the brakes on recovery if they take effect on march 1st. he urged republicans and democrats to set aside their differences to find a solution. now, bernanke also said he understood japanese prime minister shinzo abe's push for heaid abe i trying to boost the economy and is not manipulating exchange rates to devalue the yen. >>> u.s. president barack obama wants republicans to compromise before budget cuts take effect on friday. >> there are too many republicans in con
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking
. >> name one person who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the u.s. senate. >>he use of intimition -- i should have used influence. >> he could not name one person publicly. this is gamesmanship of the first order. you have conversations with plenty of members of congress and they feel one way about some of the issues in the middle east, that they simply cannot move an inch on issues involving israel. >> is he in command of the issues? >> i dnot think anybody would have come off well. i think it was a halting performance by chuck hagel, and chuck hagel underline what nina said earlier, not a burbling- nimble person. not a guy that is known for sound bites, not somebody that you would go to for a quotation on deadlines. he would give the thought of context or any answer he would give -- >> god forbid. [laughter] >> more than anything else, i could not get over the badger and quality. yes or no. yes or no, senator. john mccain was looking for vindication for the surge. chuck hagel was not going to give it to him. >> john mccain is not the issue, it is chuck hagel. his problem is not some
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about h positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq
parade tomorrow. the game was the third most- watched program in u.s. television history, despite a power outage that halted play for 34 minutes. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to the compelling story of u.s. military veteran chris kyle. iraqi insurgents once dubbed navy seal chris kile the devil of ramaddi. a man who gained a reputation as one of the deadliest snipers in u.s. military history credited with more than 150 kills. insurgents even put a five-figure bounty on his head that was never collected. last year kile recounted his life as a sharp shooter in a best-selling book american sniper. just two weeks ago he spoke of the trouble many american troops have coming home and readjusting to civilian life. >> you're vulnerable. you're doing it for the greater good. all of a sudden you don't have an identity. >> brown: on saturday 38-year-old kile and a friend 345-year-old chad littlefield were shot dead at a gun range outside fort worth texas. >> mr. kile works with people that are suffering from some issues that have been in the military. t
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
, likely methods of attack on the u.s. homela. ge body of intelligence we got by capturing khalid sheikh mohammed and putting him through enhanced inter know,rogati thers been some f.b.i. officials that said we have this information, some of the information that he divulged we had from other sources. >> well, he was telling us the truth. >> rose: but if you had the information beforehand, was it necessary? >> so we should have killed khalid sheikh mohammed? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i'm a big believer in the interrogation program. the point is -- >> rose: b i mean go ahead. >> k.s.m. was more than anybody else objected to enhanced interrogation techniques and more than anybody else provided us with key pieces of intelligence that we needed in order to defend the nation against al qaeda. >> rose: define "enhanced interrogation." >> it was a specific set of techniques that were used, applied to detainees. every one of those techniques were used on our own people in training. through our seal program, the asian program. >> rose: including waterboarding? >> including waterboarding. a t ofamer
remained concerned. the u.s. catholic bishops said they are studying the proposal. >>> also this week, president obama made a strong push for comprehensive immigration reform this week, as did some members of the senate, who presented their own bipartisan plan. faith groups across the religious spectrum praised both efforts, saying legislation should be passed without delay. in recent months, religious leaders have led an aggressive campaign for immigration reform. >> for us, for many of us who are here, that immigration is part of a consistent life ethic that respects the human person. >>> meanwhile, as congress heard testimony on gun violence from former congresswoman gabrielle giffords and others, prominent members of the faith community continued to advocate for stricter gun laws. african-american clergy from around the country gathered in washington and ged that more attention be paid to gun violence in urban areas. in addition to stronger gun control, they lobbied for federal resources for community anti-violence programs. >> we all as clergy leaders and faith leaders expressed
to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in tora bora in 2001 when u.s. special forces more or less had him in a one square mile box. >> rose: right. >> and the eyes of the world were on him and september 11th was so fresh in everybody's mind. it was just a couple months after that. we were working on that film for a number of years, researching it, writing it and were pretty close to actually making it and then things changed. but i think we were both curious just as americans or as citizens or what have you. >> rose: what was going on there, why did it take so long. what were they doing. how, you have america, the most powerful nation on the planet and you have this guy. and ten years. an to try to kind of unpack that and take people behind the scenes and show them what it would be like to be an intel officer, tacking bin laden and bring that intel to life. >> rose: and how they did it. >> and how they did it. >> rose: so if i go to the cia i will find a young agent that looked like jessica chastain that was at the centre of this team that found -- >> well, first of all, there are som
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)